Election 2016

Ali’s Biggest Win: As Clay v. United States in Supreme Court

readersupportednews.orgBoardman writes: “Much of the coverage of Muhammad Ali’s death kind of ducks how polarizing his life was in the 1960s as a brash young black man who loudly touted his own talents and called out the world for what it was. He was loved and he was hated, and he was especially hated by mindless sports writers reflecting the mindless prejudices of their (and our) time (with some courageous exceptions like Robert Lipsyte, Howard Cosell, Dave Anderson, and others).”

uch of the coverage of Muhammad Ali’s death kind of ducks how polarizing his life was in the 1960s as a brash young black man who loudly touted his own talents and called out the world for what it was. He was loved and he was hated, and he was especially hated by mindless sports writers reflecting the mindless prejudices of their (and our) time (with some courageous exceptions like Robert Lipsyte, Howard Cosell, Dave Anderson, and others). Some of the hate still shows in the grudging tone of some postmortems, and perhaps as well in the general downplaying or omission of what was arguably Muhammad Ali’s greatest victory, his unanimous decision by the Supreme Court in Clay v. United States. The case emerged naturally enough out of American racism, eventually involving imperial war and government criminality, a nexus that plagues us still.

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