Election 2016

History: John Lewis walks free

clarionledger.comIn 1961, Mississippi arrested wave after wave of Freedom Riders that dared to enter an “all-white” area of the bus station, including future Congressman John Lewis. They were arrested, convicted and sent to Mississippi’s most notorious prison, the State Penitentiary at Parchman. Lewis was finally freed on July 7, 1961. (Photo: Mississippi Department of Archives and History)

July 5, 1827: A day after those enslaved were freed in the state of New York, 4,000 African Americans marched along Broadway through downtown streets to the African Zion Church, where abolitionist leader William Hamilton said, “This day we stand redeemed from a bitter thralldom.” Celebrations took place as far away as Boston and Philadelphia. In New York’s capital, Nathaniel Paul, pastor of the First African Baptist Society, declared, “We look forward … (to) when this foul stain will be entirely erased, and this, worst of evils, will be forever done way … God who has made of one blood all nations of men, and who is said to be no respecter of persons, has so decreed; I therefore have no hesitation in declaring this sacred place, that not only throughout the United States of America, but throughout every part of the habitable world where slavery exists, it will be abolished.”

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